Education Quality Measure of Undergraduate Students of Speech and Language Pathology in Pakistan

Education Quality Measure of Speech and Language Pathology

Authors

  • Sadaf Hameed Rashid Latif Institute of Allied Health Sciences
  • Nayab Iftikhar Center of Clinical Psychology, Punjab University
  • Ayeshah Firdous Rashid Latif Institute of Allied Health Sciences
  • Muhammad Azzam Khan Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, University of Lahore
  • Sabahat Khan Rashid Latif Institute of Allied Health Sciences
  • Atia Ur Rehman Rashid Latif Institute of Allied Health Sciences
  • Mishal Butt Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, University of Lahore
  • Tallat Anwar Faridi University Institute of Public Health, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, University of Lahore

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.54393/pbmj.v5i4.401

Keywords:

Education, Quality, Speech, Language, Pathology

Abstract

Undergraduate of Speech and Language Pathology study the basics of the mechanism of human communication, and pathology faced by humans in Speech, Language and Swallowing. Objective: To measure the quality of education of undergraduate students of speech and language pathology Methods: The study was observational and cross-sectional in nature, with data collected using a purposive sampling technique. Students from both the public and private sectors from various institutes and universities across Lahore took part in the study Results: The results indicated that 40 students (61.50%) felt a "need for self-improvement" in terms of self-perception in academia. In terms of atmosphere perception, 44 (67.70%) of students had "a more positive attitude." In terms of learning perception, 58 students (89.20%) reported having a "more positive perception of the education they receive." According to perceptions of course organizers, 51 (78.50%) of students believe they are "moving in the right direction." In terms of social self-perception, 54 students (83.10%) rated themselves as "Sociable." In the study, students of all years had different perceptions of learning, course organizers, self-perceptions in academia, atmosphere, and society, but none of these perceptions differed based on gender or institutes Conclusions: First-year students had a more positive perception of academics, self-perception, course organizers, academic atmosphere, social and self-perception than students of other years.

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Published

2022-04-30

How to Cite

Hameed, S. ., Iftikhar, N. ., Firdous, A. ., Azzam Khan, M. ., Khan, S. ., Rehman, A. U., Butt, M. ., & Faridi, T. A. . (2022). Education Quality Measure of Undergraduate Students of Speech and Language Pathology in Pakistan: Education Quality Measure of Speech and Language Pathology. Pakistan BioMedical Journal, 5(4), 114–118. https://doi.org/10.54393/pbmj.v5i4.401

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